BBW_Feature

Banned Book Week
(9/30 – 10/6)

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Banned Book Week. Begun in 1982 by Judith Krug and sponsored by the ALA, the American Booksellers Association, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression (ABFFE), American Society of Journalists and Authors, Association of American Publishers, and the National Association of College Stores, Banned Book Week focuses awareness to the First Amendment, literature, and the inherent dangers of limiting access to information.

Top 10 Challenged Books for 2011

(Source: ALA: Frequently challenged books of the 21st century)

Each year, the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom compiles a list of the top ten most frequently challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship in libraries and schools. The ALA condemns censorship and works to ensure free access to information.

A challenge is defined as a formal, written complaint, filed with a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of content or appropriateness. The number of challenges reflects only incidents reported. [The ALA] estimate that for every reported challenge, four or five remain unreported. Therefore, we do not claim comprehensiveness in recording challenges.

Out of 326 challenges as reported by the Office for Intellectual Freedom:

ttyl; ttfn; l8r, g8r (series), by Lauren Myracle
Reasons: offensive language; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group

The Color of Earth (series), by Kim Dong Hwa
Reasons: nudity; sex education; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group

The Hunger Games trilogy, by Suzanne Collins
Reasons: anti-ethnic; anti-family; insensitivity; offensive language; occult/satanic; violence

My Mom’s Having A Baby! A Kid’s Month-by-Month Guide to Pregnancy, by Dori Hillestad Butler
Reasons: nudity; sex education; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
Reasons: offensive language; racism; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group

Alice (series), by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
Reasons: nudity; offensive language; religious viewpoint

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
Reasons: insensitivity; nudity; racism; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit

What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones
Reasons: nudity; offensive language; sexually explicit

Gossip Girl (series), by Cecily Von Ziegesar
Reasons: drugs; offensive language; sexually explicit


To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
Reasons: offensive language; racism

 

 

For a more complete index of banned books and who banned them, check out Wikipedia’s Banned Book list.

 

 

Bookmans, an independent bookstore with six locations in Arizona, created this video for the 2012 Banned Books Week Virtual Read-Out.
During Bookmans’ 36-year fight against censorship, the shattered light bulb emerged as a powerful symbol of the importance of free speech. In this video, combining passages from banned books read by customers and employees, Bookmans created a statement about how books inform, engage and inspire the light in each of us.
Isotropic Fiction Dingbat

Have you read a banned book? Let us know. In recognition of Banned Book Week, IF will email a free copy of IF04 to anyone who reads a banned book and notes the title below or posts a comment about a banned book that changed their world. FYI: post before before 06 October 2012.

 



Isotropic Discussion

Got something to say? Here's the place to do it. Don't let a touch of visiobibliophobia or prosopobibliophobia stop you from being heard.